bolts because he is afraid they would fail."

They will fail, it is just a matter of time, it may be 500 years, but the will fail. And most likely not at the same time, but yet maybe on rappel rather then that they be replaced beforehand.

I only used that tree maybe twice, I thought it was out of the way.

This is what I do. I got a rope I chopped up, and I use a 30' length to time into a tree on one side and I hang a rap anchor on the other side over the edge of the cliff.

Or I bring a rope to rap or jummar I. I do projects, so it is either go down jummar up or I walk around. [In this case you are not going to need bolts where you would pull the rope through.]

THE NORTHERN MILLBROOK GRAND TRAVERSE LEDGE Class 4 Donald Perry 1990

It is best to approach Millbrook from the north end of the cliff rather than repelling in my opinion, I think at least once in your life when you visit Millbrook. This way you can know how to climb out of Millbrook if you need to or want to, especially in some kind of emergency.

To get to the North end of the Grand Traverse Ledge starting from Trapps Bridge follow the carriage road along the back of the Near Trapps and find the Bayards Path which will lead you to the ridge between the Near Trapps and Bayards. Follow the Ridge Trail along the top of Bayards to climb Millbrook ridge. [As a side note, in the wet seasons there is a spring that runs over the trail at this point just before the Ridge Trail starts to ascend Millbrook Mountain. You can fill up your water bottles here.]

Climbing up in elevation abruptly you will eventually reach the edge of the actual cliff edge of Millbrook Mountain by means of a few camel backs. Part way to edge of the actual cliff you will meet a rock that is 5 foot high and 10 long where the trail goes around it on the right. I am going to call this rock the "GTL Stone", because it is very near the level of the Millbrook Grand Traverse Ledge. Keep this in mind as you pass this rock. After you pass this rock on the Ridge Trail continue up the hill until you go over a hump of rock. [To identify this hump of rock note that there is a 12' long crack that is 4" wide and 3' deep that runs a few feet left and parallel to the trail on the top of this outcrop of whitish conglomerate. ] From here the trail goes down and along level through trees for a few feet before a long smooth ridge of stone that ascends up to a block a few hundred feet away. [By the way, this stone ridge and this part of the trail now make the actual stone ridge, the edge of the Millbrook cliff. Do not climb this ridge.] At the base of this stone ridge depart from the trail going left and parallel to the trail to then traverse along the cliff South East past some small caves to a finger of rock that points south opposite a very short smooth North facing corner. Start descending directly down from here and below this smooth corner facing North. You will pass a ledge of rock to the base of this short cliff to a sloping hill of leaves and trees, and underbrush. Believe it or not, you are now on the Grand Traverse Ledge in less than 5 minutes from the time you left the trail!


Edited by donald perry (03/06/12 04:08 AM)
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The Mohonk Mountain House and the Mohonk Preserve have done a great job protecting the environment thus far, but ... it's all down hill from here http://youtu.be/9AU8fMo8v4k.