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#10866 - 12/29/03 01:45 AM Snow-Making
TimTheClimber Offline
member

Registered: 10/31/03
Posts: 187
Loc: New Paltz
Is anyone up to date with the "finer points" of smowmaking?
I am curious about some of the technology involved in this process because it seems as if snowmaking is the only chance we'll get to ski here in the east! Is there a certain temperature it has to be to make snow?
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#10867 - 12/29/03 02:46 AM Re: Snow-Making [Re: TimTheClimber]
Mike Rawdon Offline

Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 11/29/99
Posts: 4276
Loc: Poughkeepsie
It has been proven possible to make snow at temps above freezing. If the humidity is low enough, the droplets cool by evaporation and freeze at temps > 32. I don't know if this was ever exploited commercially.

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#10868 - 12/29/03 03:05 AM Re: Snow-Making [Re: TimTheClimber]
quanto_the_mad Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 05/14/02
Posts: 2628
Loc: brooklyn
I've been snowboarding since mid-November this year, there's plenty of snow at the major resorts. Killington got over eight feet of snow in December, Stowe has two feet in the past seven days. Just gotta head north...
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#10869 - 12/29/03 03:10 PM Re: Snow-Making [Re: TimTheClimber]
chrisinvermont Offline
member

Registered: 05/08/01
Posts: 184
Quote:

Is anyone up to date with the "finer points" of smowmaking?
I am curious about some of the technology involved in this process because it seems as if snowmaking is the only chance we'll get to ski here in the east! Is there a certain temperature it has to be to make snow?





Not well versed in the science but snow making is basically firing compressed air and water. It usually has to have an air temp of freezing or below. The compressed air blasts the water into tiny droplets that then freeze and fall. The idea is to get the droplets small enough that it is snow like and not chunks of ice.

As stated there is plenty of snow up here, even with all the rain last week. We had over 4 foot in Burlington alone, with tons in the mountains. After the Christmas day rain, some places got another 2 feet of snow. Come on up!

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#10870 - 01/13/04 10:50 PM Similar Question... [Re: chrisinvermont]
TimTheClimber Offline
member

Registered: 10/31/03
Posts: 187
Loc: New Paltz
OK. Lets say that it just snowed an few inches the night before. The forecast calls for a high of around 35 with high winds. Will snow still melt if the thermometer registers above freezing, but the windchill brings it to below freezing?
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#10871 - 01/13/04 11:27 PM Re: Similar Question... [Re: TimTheClimber]
Mike Rawdon Offline

Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 11/29/99
Posts: 4276
Loc: Poughkeepsie
Snow can melt (or evaporate) at temps below freezing if it's in the sun. Conversely, it can be OK at temps a bit above freezing if it's shaded and in calm air so a layer of protective, cooler air can settle over it. A wind will accelerate melting because it brings warm air down to the surface (not the same effect as windchill per se).

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#10872 - 01/14/04 06:58 AM Re: Similar Question... [Re: Mike Rawdon]
crackers Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 03/21/01
Posts: 3424
Loc: pdx
but melting will continue underneath the windcrust.

and remember that if the air temp is above freezing, most of the nighttime dynamics are driven by the temperature of the ground, which is probably frozen.

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#10873 - 01/14/04 07:34 PM Re: Similar Question... [Re: crackers]
nerdom Offline
Pooh-Bah *

Registered: 09/07/01
Posts: 2483
Loc: Davis Sq., MA
I understand that some snowmaking systems employ a "cooling tower." One would think that this would make it possible to make snow in above freezing temps. I recently heard that they can make it as high as 38'? Purely anecdotal, and I'm skeptical, but I did hear it.
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