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#20432 - 05/16/06 01:37 PM It just doesn't get any better than this folks
AOR Offline
enthusiast

Registered: 08/27/04
Posts: 392
Paris suburb names street for cop-killer Abu-Jamal

By Jennifer Lin

Philadelphia Inquirer Staff Writer

As Philadelphians cope with another police slaying, news comes that a suburb of Paris has named a street for Mumia Abu-Jamal, convicted of the 1981 murder of Police Officer Daniel Faulkner. Hundreds of supporters of Abu-Jamal attended a ceremony on April 29 to dedicate the Rue Mumia-Abu Jamal in the city of St.-Denis. "In France, they see him as a towering figure," said Suzanne Ross, cochair of the Free Mumia Coalition of New York City, who was part of the ceremony. Ross said the street is in the town's Human Rights district, which includes Nelson Mandela Stadium. Richard Costello, past president of the Philadelphia lodge of the Fraternal Order of Police, said the street dedication was "deplorable" but "consistent with the offensive position the French have taken in this matter. They've made him into some type of hero." Abu-Jamal, 53, was sentenced to death in 1982 for the shooting of Faulkner, who was 25. A memorial plaque honoring Faulkner has been installed at 13th and Locust Streets, where he was shot. Abu-Jamal, a former Philadelphia journalist, Black Panther member, and critic of police brutality, has maintained his innocence. Last year, a federal appeals court agreed to consider Abu-Jamal's appeal of his conviction. The court said it would consider Abu-Jamal's allegation of racial bias in jury selection, as well as claims that the prosecutor gave an improper summation and that a judge in a previous appeal was biased. The street naming in St.-Denis was part of a three-day event sponsored by the French city, Ross said. She said there were speakers on such issues as the death penalty, human rights, the Abu-Jamal case, and the 1985 bombing of the MOVE headquarters in West Philadelphia. Ross said Pam and Ramona Africa, MOVE leaders and supporters of Abu-Jamal, spoke about the "unfulfilled quest for justice in that case." When notified of the French dedication, Maureen Faulkner, widow of the victim, called it "disgusting." "This is so unnerving for me to get this news," Faulkner said from Los Angeles, where she lives. "It's insulting to the police officers of Philadelphia that they are naming a street after a murderer." The campaign to free Abu-Jamal has generated international attention, particularly among anti-death-penalty activists in France. At the dedication ceremony, Julia Wright, a translator in Paris and daughter of the late African American author Richard Wright, called Abu-Jamal "our Mandela." Maureen Faulkner, on the other hand, urged Americans to boycott Paris. "The people of Philadelphia should think if they have any trips to Paris this summer, to cancel those trips," Faulkner said. Of the French support of Abu-Jamal, she added: "These are the people who sheltered Ira Einhorn" - a fugitive who was finally returned to Philadelphia and convicted of killing his girlfriend, Holly Maddux.

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#20433 - 05/16/06 02:15 PM Re: It just doesn't get any better than this folks [Re: AOR]
alicex4 Offline
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I just read that too. Disgusting.

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#20434 - 05/16/06 04:07 PM Re: It just doesn't get any better than this folks [Re: AOR]
oenophore Online   confused
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You'll have to admit that if Mr. Abu-Jamal is not guilty, he is a martyr and a very conspicuous one.
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#20435 - 05/16/06 06:11 PM Re: It just doesn't get any better than this folks [Re: oenophore]
alicex4 Offline
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I believe he is guilty. He did not plead innocent to shooting Officer Faulkner twice, once in the face when the officer was down on the sidewalk, he simply refused to talk. Why has his brother, who was stopped by Officer Faulkner for a traffic offense, never come to light and helped Mumia? I especially enjoy how Mumia's employment during the crime is referred to as a radio personality. He had a onetime talk/spot on WRTI. He was a cab driver when this crime was committed. Spin it all you like for Mumia, he is a poor shill for all who use him as a poster boy.



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#20436 - 05/16/06 06:17 PM Re: It just doesn't get any better than this folks [Re: alicex4]
pedestrian Offline
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Registered: 08/05/02
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Loc: a heavily fortified bunker!
Kind of the same thing with Carol Fisher from Cleveland. Psycho b!7ch bites the neck of a police officer and everywhere left-wing axe-grinders cry foul when she's convicted. Conveniently ignoring the facts

Some people seem to exist solely to take up causes that they know nothing about. What's up with that?

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#20437 - 05/16/06 06:23 PM Re: It just doesn't get any better than this folks [Re: alicex4]
oenophore Online   confused
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Registered: 09/24/01
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Nevertheless, you can sympathize with those who believe the man innocent and the victim of a frame due to his outspokenness and criticism of the powers that be in Philadelphia, especially the police. To many a Parisian he may well be esteemed for his continued criticism, refusal to bargain and fight to remain alive.
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#20438 - 05/16/06 06:45 PM Re: It just doesn't get any better than this folks [Re: alicex4]
Daniel Offline
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Registered: 05/23/01
Posts: 1515
One can believe Mumia is guilty and still also believe that his trial was unfair. I admit that I have not followed the case closely, but when I was living in Philly some time ago and more familiar with the issues it seemed to me that there were procedural claims that should be taken seriously.

Our system is about process, not just results. Someone can be obviously guilty beyond any shadow of a doubt (for instance, the Long Island Railroad shooting several years ago where a carload of people saw the defendant firing away), and that person still gets a fair, unbiased trial. If it's so clear that Mumia is guilty, then I don't see much to lose by admitting that there may have been significant procedural problems at trial, doing a better job at a retrial, and convicting him again. The naysayers may still protest, but they'd have a lot less to protest about.

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#20439 - 05/16/06 07:15 PM Re: It just doesn't get any better than this folks [Re: Daniel]
alicex4 Offline
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Registered: 07/05/00
Posts: 3400
All I can say is read the transcripts, something few Mumia supporters are inclined to complete (Alice Walker Ed Asner, and E. L. Doctorw to name 3). I believe Ed asner's line was "He'd fall asleep." Mumia's defense team passed on 11 black jurors before seating the jury. (10 whites 2 black) There are ballistics tests, the gun was registered to Mumia 2 1/2 years earlier. He had been fired by WHYY for erratic behavior and failure to do his reporting job, that's why he was a cabbie. His brother, to this day, will not come to his defense. An emergency nurse testified that she heard him confess to "killing that mother f%$#^&" that evening when he was brought in with a gunshot wound to the chest.
The Pennsylvania Supreme Court has turned down his appeal for a trial twice. I really don't see what else there is to do in this case. There are just death penalty opponenets out there, and i guess I am not as good Christians as they are, I support it.


If the procedural problems were Judge Sabo, just say so. I don't recall "procedural issues"


Edited by alicex4 (05/16/06 07:16 PM)

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#20440 - 05/16/06 07:24 PM Re: It just doesn't get any better than this folks [Re: oenophore]
AOR Offline
enthusiast

Registered: 08/27/04
Posts: 392
Quote:

Nevertheless, you can sympathize with those who believe the man innocent and the victim of a frame due to his outspokenness and criticism of the powers that be in Philadelphia, especially the police. To many a Parisian he may well be esteemed for his continued criticism, refusal to bargain and fight to remain alive.




Sorry...but no, I can't.
Take about 20 minutes, go to Danny Faulkner's website and read the case file relevant to the shooting. Read some of the first person accounts of what Wesley Cook (Jamal's name before the creative and colorful one he has now) said while being treated in the hospital. You may be surprised.

Charles Manson is incredibly outspoken and crictical of "the powers that be in LA, especially the police", but does that make him any less guilty?

And, why may France "esteem him"?...it's France, that's why, which pretty much explains it.
What next...Ted Bundy Boulevard?


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#20441 - 05/16/06 08:55 PM Re: It just doesn't get any better than this folks [Re: alicex4]
Daniel Offline
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Registered: 05/23/01
Posts: 1515
I've done a little browsing on the web, and I doubt there's much in the way of info by anyone who hasn't already taken one side or the other. Mumia supporters say that the police report says that Mumia made no comments at the hospital, and that an attending physician who was with Mumia the entire time says Mumia didn't say anything. And yes, having a biased judge is included within the realm of procedural errors if that bias resulted in improper rulings.

Reading the transcript may not tell us much. The complaint is what was left out: what was not presented as possibly exculpatory evidence that the prosecution is obligated to turn over to the defense. If evidence was improperly withheld, reading the transcript won't tell you about it.

I also don't see the relevance that state courts have twice turned down his appeal. Some appeals are turned down all the way to the Supreme Court, only to get reversed. Also, elected state judges can be under pressure to uphold a conviction, especially in cop-killer cases, whereas federal judges are not.

Don't know what else is there to do? What's the problem with a retrial, especially if he's so obviously guilty? Of course there has to be some finality in the system; no trial is perfect, and we can't retry everyone who complains about a verdict. The question should be whether there were enough problems at the trial to warrant doing it again, and perhaps reasonable minds can disagree on that issue. Unfortunately, I think most people who are involved with the case have already decided that they want to make sure that a cop killer fries, or that an innocent man is released. And that's simply not the way to look at this case. The issue is process, not guilt.

As for those in France naming a street after him, I'd guess that most people there don't have enough information to have an informed opinion one way or the other. It's politics trumping knowledge. But given what's going on at Guantanamo, I can't blame anyone for being suspicious about our nation's commitment to process.

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